Boost your career in TV, radio or Films with courses offered by Broadcasting Schools

“My first big break was my first day as an intern,” says Mark Bullock who works at ET Canada and who graduated from Centennial College’s Broadcasting and Film program, which covers radio broadcast, television broadcasting and film. “I met many great professors in my Centennial days as well, who taught me with a passion that was infectious and that passion is what the future needs.” As Mark’s testimonial shows, Centennial College students are prepared to be hired before they even graduate. In fact, respected companies such as CBC, Chum Television LTD, CTV, Global TV News, MTV Canada /CTV, Sun TV, and more take on students during a 15-week field placement. Additionally, other radio and television stations, including specialty channels; commercial sound and video production companies; corporate video houses; and feature and series film producers may hire students and graduates.

The Broadcasting and Film program (as it is officially known) takes three years to complete and prepares students with both the creative and technical skills they’ll need to launch careers in film, television and radio. By creating new and original story ideas, students learn how to prepare, manage and carry out the creative production and development process to realize their unique creative vision. Specific radio and television broadcasting topics covered in the course include: history of broadcasting, camerawork, radio production, editing, documentary and news production, essentials of screenwriting, sound to picture design, broadcast career management and more.

As you can tell by some of these titles, many of these offerings by the broadcasting schools are hands-on courses. The experiences gained through these courses works to the students’ advantage when it is time to embark on a 15-week work placement during which students work in the industry. During this placement, students apply practice to real life situations and gain new lessons from established broadcast production professionals. In order to qualify for placement, students participating in film producer training and television broadcast training must meet specific requirements.

Also helping students to prepare for the radio or television broadcasting or film placement are facilities such as Centennial College’s Wallace studios, which is an HDTV broadcasting studio with extensive digital film abilities. This studio is not only used for practice but gives students a chance to work on student-made films that further film producer training and on TV programs, including the JOURNAL, a student-produced newsmagazine TV show that airs live and online, to further television broadcast training.

To apply for this program, students must have completed an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or equivalent, or have mature student status (19 years of age or older). They also must have an English Grade 12 C or U or equivalent, or skills assessment. As part of the application process, students must also attend a program admission session during which they will complete a Broadcast and Film Writing test and submit either a portfolio that demonstrates their ability to tell a story (two examples of media work that you have authored. Media work includes video, audio, digital images and TV/film scripts) or a resume that includes media related experience plus two letters of recommendation.

Emma wrote this article presenting Centennial College’s radio and television broadcasting programs. Moreover, she gives an outline on how broadcasting schools prepare the students to take a challenging in the radio, TV or films.

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Broadcasting
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